Food That Cure Muscle Disease

Muscle Disease 

Muscle diseases occur in all age groups and can cause significant physical disability. Their impact is especially serious when children and young adults are affected. The needs of these patients are diverse and complicated, and frequently not adequately met. Some muscle diseases respond well to medical treatment, while many of the physical disabilities can be improved or prevented. Hence, although muscle diseases are not as common as other neurological disorders such as stroke or epilepsy, they deserve our fullest attention.

Symptoms

Progressive muscle weakness is the main feature of muscular dystrophy. Each separate form of muscular dystrophy varies a bit in terms of the age at which the signs and symptoms usually begin and the sequence in which different muscle groups are affected.

About half of all muscular dystrophy cases are the Duchenne variety, which most commonly occurs in boys. Signs and symptoms typically first surface when the child begins to walk and may include:
  • Frequent falls
  • Difficulty getting up from a lying or sitting position
  • Trouble running and jumping
  • Waddling gait
  • Large calf muscles
  • Learning disabilities
Certain other types of muscular dystrophy are defined by a specific feature or the location of the body where symptoms first begin. Examples include:
  • Myotonic: Also known as Steinert's disease, this form of muscular dystrophy also features an inability to relax muscles at will. It most often begins in early adulthood. Muscles of the face are usually the first to be affected.
  • Limb-girdle: The hip and shoulder muscles are usually the first affected in this type of muscular dystrophy. In some cases, it becomes difficult to lift the front part of the foot, so frequent tripping may occur. Signs and symptoms may begin from early childhood to adulthood.
  • Congenital: This category of muscular dystrophy is apparent at birth or becomes evident before age 2. Some forms progress slowly and cause only mild disability, while others progress rapidly and cause severe impairment.
  • Fascioscapulohumeral (FSHD): One of the most striking signs of this variety of muscular dystrophy is that the shoulder blades might stick out like wings when the person raises his or her arms. Onset usually occurs in teens or young adults.
  • Oculopharyngeal: The first sign of this type of muscular dystrophy is usually drooping of the eyelids. Weakness of the muscles of the eye, face and throat often results in swallowing difficulties. Signs and symptoms first appear in adulthood, usually in a person's 40s or 50s.

How can I know if I have Muscle Disease?

Some generalizations can be made. Skeletal muscle weakness is the hallmark of most myopathies, with some noticeable exceptions, such as myotonia and paramyotonia congenita. In these two inheritable muscular disorders, the muscles become enlarged, rather than weakened and atrophied, and do not relax after contracting.
In most myopathies, weakness occurs primarily in the muscles of the shoulders, upper arms, thighs, and pelvis (proximal muscles). In some cases, the distal muscles of the hands and feet may be involved during the advanced stage of disease.
Other typical symptoms of muscle disease include the following:
  • Aching
  • Cramping
  • Pain
  • Stiffness
  • Tenderness
  • Tightness
Initially, individuals may feel fatigued doing very light physical activity. Walking and climbing stairs may be difficult because of weakness in the pelvic and leg muscles that stabilize the trunk. Patients often find it difficult to rise from a chair. As the myopathy progresses, there may be muscle wasting.

Food That Cure Muscle Disease

Whole Eggs: Cheap & rich source of protein: 7g/egg. The yolk contains most nutrients: half the protein, vitamins A/D/E and cholesterol to naturally increase your testosterone levels. Don't worry about cholesterol in eggs. Dietary cholesterol isn't bound to blood cholesterol. If you have bad cholesterol, lower your body fat rather than throwing the yolk away.

Wild Salmon: One of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids that also gets you 20g protein per 100g serving. Farm raised salmon is, however, omega-3 deficient: it's corn/grain fed. Go with wild salmon.

Berries: Strong antioxidants that prevent cancer, heart & eye diseases. Any kind works: cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, etc. Buy fresh or frozen berries and mix with oatmeal.

Yogurt: Contain bacteria that improve your gastrointestinal health. Don't buy frozen yogurt or yogurt with added sugar and fruits at the bottom. Get plain low fat yogurt. Eat it with berries & flax seeds.

Flax Seeds: Source of fiber, protein & omega-3. Grind the flax seeds to get the most out of them. Take 1 tbsp with yogurt & berries before going to bed.

Mixed Nuts: Contain mono & polyunsaturated fats, proteins, fiber, vitamin E, zinc, potassium, magnesium, etc. Mixed nuts are caloric dense, great if you're a skinny guy who wants to gain weight.

Red Meat: Protein, vitamin B12, heme iron, zinc, creatine, carnosine and even omega-3 if you eat grass-fed beef. Eat steaks & hamburgers from top round or sirloin. Read Dr. Lonnie Lowery's article on Meat.

Turkey: If you don't believe saturated fat is good for you, try white turkey. The leanest beef has about 4.5g saturated fat/100g, while white turkey has close to 0g (that why it's so dry). Eat turkey with spinach & quinoa.

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