Mood Disoder ("Food That Heal")

Food That Heal

Mood Disoder:

Introduction

When you think of mood disorders, depression and bipolar disorder likely come to mind first. That's because these are common, severe illnesses and leading causes of disability. Depression and bipolar disorder can be emotionally crippling, making it difficult to live life to its fullest. What you may not know is that two milder versions of these mood disorders can also take a toll, and can go undiagnosed. These are called dysthymic disorder and cyclothymic disorder.

This mood disorder is a less severe form of depression. Although less extreme, dysthymic disorder causes chronic of long-lasting moodiness. With dysthymic disorder, low, dark moods invade your life nearly every day for two years or more. Dysthymia is contrasted with a full major depressive episode that lasts two years or longer, which is called chronic major depression.

Dysthymic disorder can occur alone or along with other psychiatric or mood disorders. As with depression, dysthymic disorder is more common in women than in men. A family history of mood disorders is not uncommon. This mood disorder tends to appear earlier than major depression, although it can begin anytime from childhood to later in life.

Up to 5% of the general population is affected by dysthymic disorder. But its cause is not well understood. A combination of factors likely conspires to create this mood disorder. These factors may include:

  • Genetics
  • Abnormalities in the functioning of brain circuits involve in emotional processing
  • Chronic stress or medical illness
  • Isolation
  • Poor coping strategies and problems adjusting to life stresses

These factors can feed off each other. For example, if you always see "the glass as half empty," you may reinforce the symptoms of depression. And a chronic mood disorder can sensitize you to stress, further feeding your risk for depression.

Symptoms

In addition to chronic low moods, common symptoms of this mood disorder include:

  • Feelings of hopelessness or helplessness
  • Trouble sleeping or daytime sleepiness
  • Poor appetite or eating too much
  • Fatigue or low energy
  • Low self-esteem
  • Trouble concentrating or making decisions

A diagnosis of dysthymic disorder in adults requires at least a two-year history of depressed mood for most of the day on most days, along with at least two of the symptoms noted above. Although some symptoms may overlap, you may be less likely to have weight or sleep changes with dysthymic disorder than with depression. You may also tend to withdraw more and have stronger feelings of pessimism and inadequacy than with major depression.

How can I know if I have Mood Disorders?

  • Loss of interest in work, school, hobbies, people
  • Social isolation
  • Agitation and irritability
  • Low energy and lethargy
  • Sad mood
  • Changes in appetite or weight eating too little or too much
  • Oversleeping or insomnia
  • Feeling restless or slowed down
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in all or most things
  • No interest or pleasure in your baby
  • Crying for no reason
  • Excessive worrying about your baby
  • Scary thoughts about harming your baby
  • Anxiety or panic attacks
  • No desire to be with family or friends

Food That Cure Mood Disorders

Oatmeal: Oatmeal may help if you find yourself feeling irritable and cranky. It is rich in soluble fiber, which helps to smooth out blood sugar levels by slowing the absorption of sugar into the blood. Oatmeal is also a great food to help you stick with your diet plan, because the soluble fiber in oatmeal forms a gel that slows the emptying of your stomach so you don't feel hungry quickly.

Walnuts: Walnuts have long been thought of as a "brain food" because of their wrinkled, bi-lobed (brainlike) appearance. But now we know that walnuts are an excellent source of omega-3 essential fatty acids, a type of fat that's needed for brain cells and mood-lifting neurotransmitters to function properly and possible help some people with depression.

Tea: Although caffeine has been shown to lead to a more positive mood and improved performance, it's a fine line. Too much caffeine can make you dependent and make you nervous, irritable, hypersensitive or bring on headaches.

Salmon: In the past few years, research has suggested that vitamin D may increase the levels of serotonin, one of the key neurotransmitters influencing our mood, and that it may help to relieve mood disorders.

Learn about Mood Disoder. Use Food That Heal App.

#FoodThatHeal http://goo.gl/dvww2k




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